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Anyway to silence the GPWS?

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Every time I make my final approach to land, the GPWS starts yelling at me...."Terrain....Terrain".  I tried silencing the horn using the "Terrain" button under the "GRND PROX" on the pedestal but it doesn't seem to do anything.  Am I missing something?  Pls help...its driving me crazy!!!

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36 minutes ago, Frank Docter said:

You are not missing anything, this is a bug in the current product. 

 

thanks frank!

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vor 43 Minuten, Hans Hartmann sagte:

It's not a bug... if you get that sound, it means that you are within 60 seconds of terrain collision. Math doesn't lie.

 

I don't think so, this would mean it would be on everytime in final approach right? Or are you just being sarcastic?

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"It's not a bug... if you get that sound, it means that you are within 60 seconds of terrain collision. Math doesn't lie."

 

I don't doubt it, but my question pertained to silencing the aural alert, not the systems ability to detect terrain.  Is there any way to mute the sound?

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No, there is not. Hans did however found a bug with mode2A and already fixed it for the next update. Annoying EGPWS callouts that should not be will not be anymore. ;) 

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On ‎10‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 2:17 PM, Hans Hartmann said:

It's not a bug... if you get that sound, it means that you are within 60 seconds of terrain collision. Math doesn't lie.

 

One of the reasons is because the aircraft captures the g/s and then goes wayyyyyyy below... Yes math doesn't lie but the aircraft doesn't fly correctly.  So one system works correctly while the others is badly faulted. 

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On ‎11‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 7:18 AM, 007 said:

"It's not a bug... if you get that sound, it means that you are within 60 seconds of terrain collision. Math doesn't lie."

 

I don't doubt it, but my question pertained to silencing the aural alert, not the systems ability to detect terrain.  Is there any way to mute the sound?

 

No there is no way to silence a GWPS warning... its there to save your life.

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2 hours ago, e190attcs said:

 

No there is no way to silence a GWPS warning... its there to save your life.

There is on pretty much all modern aircraft. GPWS inhibit is common in airliners.

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9 hours ago, XFalcon750 said:

There is on pretty much all modern aircraft. GPWS inhibit is common in airliners.

 

I thought you were referring to silencing a "Terrian, Terrian... PULL UP"....  Now I see you meant inhibiting the actual system or database. 

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3 hours ago, e190attcs said:

 

I thought you were referring to silencing a "Terrian, Terrian... PULL UP"....  Now I see you meant inhibiting the actual system or database. 

Most aircraft can silence two specific EGPWS warnings, while leaving critical warnings still enabled. The two warnings that CAN be disabled are the simple “TERRAIN” advisory (NOT the “TERRAIN TERRAIN PULL UP” warning.)

 

The single “TERRAIN” advisory can be triggered when flying level over undulating terrain (a series of hills and valleys) when at or below 2500 feet AGL. This warning is common at certain airports.

 

The second warning that can be inhibited is “GLIDESLOPE”. The reason for making that warning capable of being silenced is that many pilots when doing a visual approach may choose to descend below the ILS glideslope. It is safe to do so as long as the pilot can clearly see his aiming point on the runway visually and can insure that the touchdown will occur safely beyond the threshold. On shorter runways it may give a couple of hundred feet more distance for the rollout than would be available if the ILS glideslope was followed precisely.

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I doubt there is any airline that will allow the pilot to go below the glideslope on purpose. Most certainly it is something seriously frowned upon by the controllers. 

 

But then again, pilots will be pilots.

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6 hours ago, JRBarrett said:

Most aircraft can silence two specific EGPWS warnings, while leaving critical warnings still enabled. The two warnings that CAN be disabled are the simple “TERRAIN” advisory (NOT the “TERRAIN TERRAIN PULL UP” warning.)

 

The single “TERRAIN” advisory can be triggered when flying level over undulating terrain (a series of hills and valleys) when at or below 2500 feet AGL. This warning is common at certain airports.

 

The second warning that can be inhibited is “GLIDESLOPE”. The reason for making that warning capable of being silenced is that many pilots when doing a visual approach may choose to descend below the ILS glideslope. It is safe to do so as long as the pilot can clearly see his aiming point on the runway visually and can insure that the touchdown will occur safely beyond the threshold. On shorter runways it may give a couple of hundred feet more distance for the rollout than would be available if the ILS glideslope was followed precisely.

 

Yes I am familiar with this I've been flying professionally for 17 years... 

At the 6 airlines I've worked for its never been common place to silence EGPWS cautions, and the rare instances that we might would be if both pilots have visual contact with the terrain or obstacle.  Now as far as going below the G/S (on purpose) and silencing a "glideslope" caution, would either land you in the chief pilots office at minimum or searching for a new job.  I've flown in both the USA and Asia and I've never worked at an airline that would allow pilots to "dip below" the G/S just because its a short runway.  That is a very unsafe practice to be doing.  I don't know what kind of aircraft your flying, but try doing that in a A330 or 777 etc etc and some day its gonna be the last time. 

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7 hours ago, Mathijs Kok said:

I doubt there is any airline that will allow the pilot to go below the glideslope on purpose. Most certainly it is something seriously frowned upon by the controllers. 

 

But then again, pilots will be pilots.

 

Mathijs, there is no airline in the world that would condone this practice.

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23 hours ago, e190attcs said:

 

Yes I am familiar with this I've been flying professionally for 17 years... 

At the 6 airlines I've worked for its never been common place to silence EGPWS cautions, and the rare instances that we might would be if both pilots have visual contact with the terrain or obstacle.  Now as far as going below the G/S (on purpose) and silencing a "glideslope" caution, would either land you in the chief pilots office at minimum or searching for a new job.  I've flown in both the USA and Asia and I've never worked at an airline that would allow pilots to "dip below" the G/S just because its a short runway.  That is a very unsafe practice to be doing.  I don't know what kind of aircraft your flying, but try doing that in a A330 or 777 etc etc and some day its gonna be the last time. 

 

Deliberately dropping below the glideslope on an actual ILS approach would be completely unacceptable, I don’t dispute that.

 

I am speaking of a fully visual approach in VFR conditions, where there is no regulatory requirement to even tune the ILS, much less fly it - (though some airline SOPs may require an ILS to be tuned [if available] as an aid to situational awareness). In such conditions, the pilot will be primarily making use of a visual approach aid like PAPI.

 

And if no VGSI exists, (or if it is out of service), then the pilot will make a visual approach the old fashioned way - “visually” using his own eyes and brain to determine where the aircraft will touch down. That was the case at my local airport for several months this year during major runway construction.

 

There are many runways where the visual glideslope slope provided by PAPI is not coincident with the runways ILS glideslope, and an EGPWS “glideslope” warning can occur if the ILS is tuned while the pilot is flying the visual g/s. That is the main reason why a button to silence the EGPWS glideslope warning exists.

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18 minutes ago, JRBarrett said:

 

That is the main reason why a button to silence the EGPWS glideslope warning exists.

 

The main reason is LOC approaches but do continue this discussion, I like it. ;)

 

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4 hours ago, Frank Docter said:

 

The main reason is LOC approaches but do continue this discussion, I like it. ;)

 

You shouldn’t get the warning at all on a LOC-only approach, as the EGPWS glideslope warning requires the presence of an ILS glideslope signal... unless, of course, you are flying an ILS only to LOC minimums because the glideslope is known (or suspected) to be unreliable.

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