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NEW YEAR Question of the day (Last one)


J.Schweigler
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Well...

I see the wings flex upwards

I see it because it is flying very fast therefor the wings flex

Lift power is prodused below the wings from the speed and because the wings are lighter they bend before they lift the aircraft..

Corect?? :P

Regards,

Dot...

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Both Ailerons are deflected upwards.

I see this because they're not aligned with the wing trailing edges.

They're deflected upwards on climb out to reduce stress on the wings, caused by the bending.

As the ailerons deflect upwards, the lift decreases, therefore the wingloading is lower, the bending of the wings is reduced, and stress on the structure is less.

Lars

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I see it because it is flying very fast therefor the wings flex

Lift power is prodused below the wings from the speed and because the wings are lighter they bend before they lift the aircraft..

definitely wrong, because you can fly as fast as you want. Wingflex is only g force dependent. If you fly fast you have a lower AOA wich holds the lift as big as the weight. (horizontal)

If you pull, you make a high g load wich is of course grater the faster you fly.

Regarding the other answers, there is either something missing or incorrect

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Both Ailerons are deflected upwards.

I see this because they're not aligned with the wing trailing edges.

They're deflected upwards on climb out to reduce stress on the wings, caused by the bending.

As the ailerons deflect upwards, the lift decreases, therefore the wingloading is lower, the bending of the wings is reduced, and stress on the structure is less.

Lars

The aircraft uses the wing ailerons to turn, that's why they're never in the same position - if one goes down, the other one should go up.

To modify the flight altitude (let's say AOA, it better), the aircraft uses the tail ailerons.

Sorry to quote your phrase, Tyron, but I think it's correct.

Here's my try:

Both Ailerons are deflected upwards.

I see this because they're not aligned with the wing trailing edges.

But I also see that the rudder is deflected to left.

Both are maybe related: if you apply full left (or right) rudder, the plane would like to turn in this direction, rolling the plane. The shot could be made in first seconds after applying the full left rudder, before the plane rolls.

I'm not sure at all...

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The aircraft uses the wing ailerons to turn, that's why they're never in the same position - if one goes down, the other one should go up.

To modify the flight altitude (let's say AOA, it better), the aircraft uses the tail ailerons.

Sorry to quote your phrase, Tyron, but I think it's correct.

Here's my try:

Both Ailerons are deflected upwards.

I see this because they're not aligned with the wing trailing edges.

But I also see that the rudder is deflected to left.

Both are maybe related: if you apply full left (or right) rudder, the plane would like to turn in this direction, rolling the plane. The shot could be made in first seconds after applying the full left rudder, before the plane rolls.

I'm not sure at all...

What a scary answer :D

Scary and wrong.

The following only by the way:

Rudder is neutral on the picture, and doesn't matter at all

Tail aileron = Taileron. This are elevators used with aileron function usually seen on millitary jets. As far a I know no motorglider uses tailerons.

No complete right answered post so far.

Cheers Joachim

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Both Ailerons are deflected upwards.

I see this because they're not aligned with the wing trailing edges.

They're deflected upwards on climb out to reduce stress on the wings, caused by the bending.

As the ailerons deflect upwards, the lift decreases, therefore the wingloading is lower, the bending of the wings is reduced, and stress on the structure is less.

Lars

Ok, another reason I can think of:

Besides reducing lift on the outboard section of the wings, upward deflection of the ailerons will also decrease drag.Therefore making better use of the available power. (more power for the climb, and less to overcome drag)

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What I see: Aileroins both are deflected upwards

Why I see it: They're not aligned with the trailing edge of the wing

How it works: They're both deflected upwards to add drag, the Aileroins are acting as Spoileroins

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Ok, another reason I can think of:

Besides reducing lift on the outboard section of the wings, upward deflection of the ailerons will also decrease drag.Therefore making better use of the available power. (more power for the climb, and less to overcome drag)

Interesting. Yes, the drag would be decrased up to a point, in leveled fligt, but after this point the drag would increase.

This is not the reason.

What I see: Aileroins both are deflected upwards

Why I see it: They're not aligned with the trailing edge of the wing

How it works: They're both deflected upwards to add drag, the Aileroins are acting as Spoileroins

Only one of them is right.

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Then I'm out if ideas for the moment.

Besides reducing stress on the wings, or reducing drag, I can't think of anything.

At least, not from this picture. I know gliders use negative flap settings to increase speed when flying from thermal to thermal,

or sometimes in the approach to increase speed of descent,

but this picture looks like the aircraft is climbing.

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What I see - A glider loitering in a Thermal

How I see it - Aircraft nose is pitched up, Aileroins are acting as Spoileroins

How it works - The Aileroins are acting as Spoileroins, meaning that the Aircraft can Slow Down (increased drag). Also, the Pitch Up angle decreases the Aircraft's speed, again allowing it to Loiter in the thermal and make the most of it.

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i see a touring motor glider(tmg). its often confused with an airplane, but its actually a glider. this one is a Grob G 1, and was the first motor glider type to be built,

it has large efficient glider wings because it has a small four cylinder engine with around 90 horse power. it is designed to fly without an engine. i am also seeing it because it could be one of aerosofts upcoming products? the glider was used to train air cadets in the RAF.

the aircraft can make a powered takeoff on its own, and once it has gained altitude shut off its engine. it has a glide ratio of 1:28

:blink:

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When you ask "How it works" are you referring to how the Airleoins get in that position or why they're in that position?

"Why" is asked in qetion 2, "how" in question 3

Then I'm out if ideas for the moment.

Besides reducing stress on the wings, or reducing drag, I can't think of anything.

At least, not from this picture. I know gliders use negative flap settings to increase speed when flying from thermal to thermal,

or sometimes in the approach to increase speed of descent,

but this picture looks like the aircraft is climbing.

I never said you're complete wrong, I just told you, that you're not completely right.

What I see - A glider loitering in a Thermal

How I see it - Aircraft nose is pitched up, Aileroins are acting as Spoileroins

How it works - The Aileroins are acting as Spoileroins, meaning that the Aircraft can Slow Down (increased drag). Also, the Pitch Up angle decreases the Aircraft's speed, again allowing it to Loiter in the thermal and make the most of it.

Uhm? So you think a glider enters a thermal with intended loss of energy, to get energy in the thermal? No, really.

And No the picture has nothing to do with thermals.

i see a touring motor glider(tmg). its often confused with an airplane, but its actually a glider. this one is a Grob G 1, and was the first motor glider type to be built,

it has large efficient glider wings because it has a small four cylinder engine with around 90 horse power. it is designed to fly without an engine. i am also seeing it because it could be one of aerosofts upcoming products? the glider was used to train air cadets in the RAF.

the aircraft can make a powered takeoff on its own, and once it has gained altitude shut off its engine. it has a glide ratio of 1:28

TMG = right

confused with an airplane? It actually IS an airplane.

No it is no Grob G 1 what ever this shopuld be (the only Grob TMG, I know of, is the G109)

The plane in the picture is a H36 Dimona from Hoffmann. And sorry, gliding is a mess with such a plane. It is a cheap way of flying, because of less maintenance costs and a low fuel consumption but not designed as a glider. You can fly without the engine, and you're allowed to do but belive me I tried it. It is a mess, at least for pilots who know "real" sailplanes also

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What I see: H36 Dimona with both Ailerons deflected upwards

Why I see it: The Ailerons are rasied above the trailing edge of the wing, acting as Spoileron Airbrakes

How it works: This is how the Schempp-Hirth Type Airbake works, raising the Ailerons to act of Spoilerons, often used on Approach

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Why I see it: The Ailerons are rasied above the trailing edge of the wing

How it works: This is how the Schempp-Hirth Type Airbake works, raising the Ailerons to act of Spoilerons, often used on Approach

Why is not intended as "Why you see it" but "why are they up"

Schempp Hirth Spoilers are seen in the Aerosoft Discus for example, they normally aren't linked to any control surface on the plane.

On gliders with flaps they are sometimes, but it isn't the definition of "Schempp Hirth airbrakes" Schempp Hirth airbrakes are one kind of spoilers coming out on top of the wing.

What do you see? A glider

Why do you see it? Because I have eyes... and you have put it there! :P

And how does it work? A glider, as the word sais, glides in the air...

Man.. if you said motorglider, you got it, lol.

But it is not the question here :lol::lol:

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What I see: A H36 with both Ailerons deflected upwards

Why I see it: They're in that position to increase drag on the outer section of each wing, and to reduce lift

How it works: The Ailerons will both Increase Drag and Decrease Lift if both Deflected upwards, because the Airflown will be disrupted over the wing, and also Air Resistance will increase when Deflected

I'm trying really hard here lol, am I even close?blush.gif

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