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fergusdog

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About fergusdog

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    Flight Student - Groundwork
  1. OpenFlight is not a bad choice. I'd suggest that you have a closer look at Collada (as mentioned above). Pretty much all 3D modellers I'm working with switched to Collada and it looks like it's going to become an industry standard. Since SketchUp is supporting Collada lot's of people are cranking out models at high speed and populate Google Earth that way. It's very much possible that Collada will be THE standard in 2 years time. Just coming from a 3D landscape conference and several developers were asked the question if their software supports Collada...
  2. my wish list: dynamic atmosphere - model wind that follows the terrain (up/down drafts; sea/land wind, etc) realistic cloud lighting - sun illuminates clouds from below at sun set/rise LOD vegetation a la SpeedTree Other features on my wish list have been mentioned multiple times On the technical side, I'd like the graphics to be at least like the videos I've seen for FarCry2. FarCry2 supports hang gliders apparently, it can page terrain on demand and it looks just stunning. You will probably want to support Collada files which are quickly becoming the standard in 3D modelling and are supported by SketchUp. Also, check out www.lenne3d.de. Biosphere3D has some great features, but is open source and has no flight modelling. I can easily introduce you to the guys behind it. Christian
  3. Ah, the interface topic - while we're at it, I agree with you Mathijs, nice and simple. Can we please have something modern? A web 2.0 interface like twitter.com (or iPhone OX), where everything is big and simple. And please, please, use a text recognition interface, like Quicksilver for the Mac or Launchy for Windows. I want to be able to set up a flight only with keyboard by typing 'C172' tab '14:34' tab 'hamburg' tab 'today' and get drop down options when typing the aircraft and airport (you need to have a look at Launchy to understand this properly, but I recommend installing Launchy anyway, it's probably the biggest productivity tool I have on my PC). The FSX interface is cumbersome and outdated - we need something different (though I'm not a fan of the X-Plane interface either).
  4. Thanks Ian Don't have lat/lon here, but if you go to the Omarama gliding strip NZOA, then fly North to Lake Ohau (fairly big lake, you can't miss it) and then fly along the ridges. I tried the east ridge with a westerly around 20 knots, and was getting +2-4 m/s, probably average about 3 m/s. I didn't I used the console window, but wasn't sure what values to expect. The complication I could see with a 20m mesh is that you have a lot more going on along the slope. I'd be interested in your findings Cheers, Christian
  5. Sorry Ian. I didn't mean to put your work down, in fact I believe it's really original, I thought about this problem myself and one of the first things in simconnect I was checking was if it gives access to the mesh. I had a chat about that with a developer from Aces, so when I saw your work around I was impressed! I know that the MS box system is terrible. I was simply surprised how little lift I got on a steep mountain side with 15-20 knts crosswind (as I wrote above it was between +2 and +4). This may very well be realistic, I have to admit I know nothing about real world gliding so this was just a question. Being very ignorant I assumed there were 3 possibilities: a) What I saw is realistic I don't know how to propely get maximum lift (I tried several spots across the ridge for about 30 min) c) New Zealand is an extreme case with very steep slopes and my 20m mesh is really quite detailed. Maybe sim_probe can't quite cope with that environment (again, not trying to put your work down, it's excellent) BTW, the spot I picked was around Omarama, quite a famous gliding spot... Here's an idea. Given that I don't know what I'm doing, I'd be happy to send you a (free) CD of the NZ mesh (it's $70 payware) and you could test sim_probe in an extreme environment. Plus, you get to glide in some stunning scenery... Cheers, Christian
  6. Thanks for your reply Peter. I realise the commitment, I'm a scenery designer myself. I'm simply thinking out loud, because I'd love to have much more realistic atmospheric modelling in FS. In regards to the coasts I have some ideas on how to do that (ie check the landcover below). I'm simply wondering if you'd be open to creating a team and bringing in some other talent (not saying I know of people who want to contribute, but I know a few people who may be interested). Not trying to step on your toes, I simply love your add-on and see some future potential that no one ever has even considered so far... Cheers, Christian
  7. Hi Peter & Ian I just tried cumulusX! and sim_probe and love the combo. To me this is one of the most ingenious add-ons for FSX - even for non-gliders. :yahoo: To quickly introduce myself, Im quite involved in the FS scene, have a reputation as a scenery designer (http://www.simpilotexperience.com) and also run a free online magazine (http://www.simpilotnet.com). I would love to take this add-on to the next level. There are more wind effects (maybe not just gliding related) like coastal winds. I'm wondering if you would be interested in developing your programs into a new kind of weather add-on which makes atmospheric modelling in FSX much more realistic. I got some ideas and contacts that would help pull it of, so I just want to check how you guys feel about that... Another question, I ran sim_probe on my 20m New Zealand mesh and found that the lift wasn't as strong compared to FSX missions or FS2004 CCS. I was above quite a steep mountain side with 20 knots crosswinds and got lift about +4 max. This meant that I would only get lift at about 70 knots in the glider, so I couldn't really develop any good speed. Is this what I should expect? Cheers, Christian
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