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Sad ending of 2011


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For me 2011 will end on a sad not as I lost my first Bronco today. Flight went normal but suddenly my right engine cought fire. I don't know why yet because I kept the parameters withing the limits and only flew with ~85% but somehow it happened. I managed to extinguish the fire but crashed into the trees some 8 miles away from a saving runway. The Bronco is quite difficult to fly with only one engine.

Here are a few shots of this sad flight ...

bronco7.jpg

bronco8.jpg

bronco9.jpg

bronco10.jpg

bronco11.jpg

Guess I need to do some research why the engine cought fire suddenly. It was a great flight and a surprising hand full to manage the situation. Great immersive addon indeed! Can't wait for fully featured package with more models.

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Note !!

Though the TRQ lights comes on at 2200 ft/lb, engines will get damaged if operated for prolounged period above 1878 ft/lb.

TIT above 996°C will also end with a dead engine. On You screenshots I can see that You are very close to that point.

Finn

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Just posted you a Navy Bird Cowboy................... Maybe flying that one will just get your feet wet...... Sorry bout your other one burning... shoulda packed some weenies ... and had a weenie roast

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The Bronco is quite difficult to fly with only one engine.

As you say, it's quite a handful, but it can be done.

There are two things you need to pull it off: speed and trim.

Don't allow the speed to drop. Increase power on the live engine, or (if you have sufficient altitude) drop the nose a little. It's very easy to lose speed quickly while you're trying to control the aircraft after the engine failure, and the slower you fly the harder it gets.

Use rudder trim to stop the aircraft from rolling/yawing. The Bronco is much easier to handle when it's properly trimmed out. If you're using a programmable joystick use a couple of buttons or a hatswitch for trim. That way you can trim without having to take your eyes of the screen, to find the proper key combinations on your keyboard.

I don't know what the official speeds and configurations are, but i find that you can fly a single engine approach with flaps 20 and a speed of around 100 kts, or you could fly that approach in clean config and some 110-120 kts.

It all went fine for me until after landing, when i had to veer off into the grass next to the runway. That #%#^&% controller had a 737 land at the opposite end of the runway. No one was hurt. ;)

Btw, fs x seems to have a ready supply of new and refurbished Bronco's in the free flight menu. I know because my Bronco seems to have an affinity to treetops. Usually i can control it, but ...

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ddeuce: I'm not convinced that the kerosene blaze and the thick black smoke make for a suitable barbeque. You may find that your weenie gets too blistered and charred, and unfit for human consumption.

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I can't get any damage.I had the " No Failures" not checked Try to fly well over the max engine parameters for very long time, with TRQ lights and TiT/EGT high warning light lit but no Engine Fail.Any Idea?

Maury

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I don't know what the official speeds and configurations are, but i find that you can fly a single engine approach with flaps 20 and a speed of around 100 kts, or you could fly that approach in clean config and some 110-120 kts.

Jaap why would you use flaps in this condition? Would it not be easier to stay high and fast, then cut throttle?

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Mathijs, again, i have no experience with how the Broco is flown under these circumstances (or anyother circumstances :)). It's just what i know of aeroplanes in general.

Flaps cause both lift and drag. The lift is nice at slower speeds, but more importantly the drag makes the aircraft easier to fly. If you have little drag you need little power, and engines tend to react more slowly to powerlever movements at low powersettings.

Secondly, lack of drag means that the aircraft will not decelerate as quickly once you cut the power. It's easier to control with some flaps / drag.

The maximum amount of flaps (drag) is limited by the fact that you need to be able to climb away in case of a go around. Most aircraft i know fly an engine out approach with reduced flap setting (and one could consider no flaps a reduced flapsetting as well).

High and fast is not a stabilized approach, and it will put you in a more difficult position if you need to go around (i'm not talking about "interstates" here, where anything goes. ;)).

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