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Aerosoft Aircraft: Twin Otter (released)


Mathijs Kok
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2 hours ago, Mathijs Kok said:

 

We never make any problem about that and the MSFS add-ons we make are sold without DRM. You can install them as many times as you want, as long as it is on your systems. Even if you use them at the same time. You paid for it, your software.

 

Thanks. I will just install it on my old computer then, until I get the new one. No need for me to contact support.

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On 11/20/2021 at 4:32 AM, paulwareiNG said:

@Mathijs Kok Here's a cheeky question for you.  :)

 

Given we've all been patient, and not pestered you at all ;) how about you combine the twotter and the Antarctic scenery in a single offer and save us a few $?

 

 

 

On 11/20/2021 at 6:35 AM, Mathijs Kok said:

 

I'll discuss that.

 

Bump ...

 

😉

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vor 11 Stunden , Transair27 sagte:

counting sleeps anyone?   Better than waiting for Christmas I think!!!!! At least you know what's coming!

 

No time to count the sleeps ... I have to plan my XXL route (13.000 nm) 😉 ... I do it with LNVM what is really great stuff .... my biggest worry is that I will mess up the landing on my very first flight. 

 

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On 1/15/2022 at 9:42 AM, Jan R. Storelvmo said:

 

I've never flown a Twin Otter in real life, but to answer generally. It's common procedure to feather the propellers in turboprops just before shutting them down. Very often for turboprops you start the engines with the props in feather. Once the engine has stabilized you take them out of feather. You need oil pressure to change the propeller blades pitch, so they cannot be moved once the engine is shut down. There's a bug in the default Caravan where you can change the prop pitch with the engine off. This is not possible in real life. 

 

I just wanted to add to this excellent post:
Feathered starts are a procedure rather unique to PT-6 and other free turbine turboprops. Garret/Honeywell for example always start with the blades mechanically locked in fine pitch for example, but I digress. On land, an unfeathered start is actually preferable because it's a 'cooler' start. The starter and engine itself don't have to work as hard to get the prop spinning because of the angle of attack of the blades. This results in cooler start up temps for the engine. However, feathered starts are normal because they are much more quiet. There is a drastic difference in noise between a turboprop idling feathered versus idling in fine pitch.

 

Most operators will start the engine with the props feathered and not advance to fine pitch until they are ready to taxi. It's somewhat of a courtesy to others on the ramp to not be making so much noise and blasting people with prop wash. If you've ever pulled the GPU on a B1900 you know what I'm talking about!

Lastly they generate a fair amount of thrust even at idle so this means that starting and performing pre-taxi checks while feathered requires less effort to hold the aircraft in place before taxiing. This idle thrust can be enough to overcome the braking power on an icy ramp! This brings us to why float versions use the feathered start up procedure - they have no brakes.

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I have the Premium Deluxe version of MSFS 2020 and only a couple piston prop add-ons. Which plane should I be using to start practicing for this twin turboprop plane? I'm most concerned with learning the intricacies of a turboprop. And correctly!

 

This is going to be my birthday present to myself on Wednesday. 1400 Zulu? 0900 EST! Being retired I don't usually get up that early but, by the gods, I'll be up and ready that day.

 

Bob

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2 hours ago, IGrant said:

 

I just wanted to add to this excellent post:
Feathered starts are a procedure rather unique to PT-6 and other free turbine turboprops. Garret/Honeywell for example always start with the blades mechanically locked in fine pitch for example, but I digress. On land, an unfeathered start is actually preferable because it's a 'cooler' start. The starter and engine itself don't have to work as hard to get the prop spinning because of the angle of a attack of the blades. This results in cooler start up temps for the engine. However, feathered starts are normal because they are much more quiet. There is a drastic difference in noise between a turboprop idling feathered versus idling in fine pitch.

 

Most operators will start the engine with the props feathered and not advance to fine pitch until they are ready to taxi. It's somewhat of a courtesy to others on the ramp to not be making so much noise and blasting people with prop wash. If you've ever pulled the GPU on a B1900 you know what I'm talking about!

Lastly they generate a lot generate a fair amount of thrust even at idle so this means that starting and performing pre-taxi checks while feathered requires less effort to hold the aircraft in place before taxiing. This idle thrust can be enough to overcome the braking power on an icy ramp! This brings us to why float versions use the feathered start up procedure - they have no brakes.

Great explanation. Thanks.

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47 minutes ago, AerobaticAce said:

I have the Premium Deluxe version of MSFS 2020 and only a couple piston prop add-ons. Which plane should I be using to start practicing for this twin turboprop plane? I'm most concerned with learning the intricacies of a turboprop. And correctly!

 

The default P-6 I would say.

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1 hour ago, AerobaticAce said:

I have the Premium Deluxe version of MSFS 2020 and only a couple piston prop add-ons. Which plane should I be using to start practicing for this twin turboprop plane? I'm most concerned with learning the intricacies of a turboprop. And correctly!

 

This is going to be my birthday present to myself on Wednesday. 1400 Zulu? 0900 EST! Being retired I don't usually get up that early but, by the gods, I'll be up and ready that day.

 

Bob

 

i'd recommend the Kodiak for you

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7 hours ago, AerobaticAce said:

I have the Premium Deluxe version of MSFS 2020 and only a couple piston prop add-ons. Which plane should I be using to start practicing for this twin turboprop plane? I'm most concerned with learning the intricacies of a turboprop. And correctly!

 

This is going to be my birthday present to myself on Wednesday. 1400 Zulu? 0900 EST! Being retired I don't usually get up that early but, by the gods, I'll be up and ready that day.

 

Bob

 

The Kodiak 100 by Simworks is pretty good and definitely one of the best airplanes for MSFS. Highly recommended! :) 

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2 hours ago, Eirik Christoffersen said:

Hope you guys nail the sounds.  In my opinion the quality of the sounds is the thing that will deside if i will buy or not. Im so tired of bad turboprop sounds in flightsimulators.

I think that someone is in the process of making a video with the new sound pack. See above.

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Is the beta range and reverse modelled in this aircraft where the throttle levers change the prop pitch in beta and reverse? How easy is it to configure your throttle quadrant to get into beta and reverse? (With the Kodiak and my TQ6 throttle quadrant, it took a bit of time to find the detent between idle and beta.) Maybe there are some beta testers out there with TQ6 throttle quadrants (or Bravo quadrants) who can answer this for me.

 

I haven’t seen anyone go into beta in any of the videos I have seen and I think that low beta is sometimes used during taxi because the engines are overpowered. 

 

If this has been asked and answered, I apologize.

John.

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8 minutes ago, John2 said:

Is the beta range and reverse modelled in this aircraft where the throttle levers change the prop pitch in beta and reverse? How easy is it to configure your throttle quadrant to get into beta and reverse? (With the Kodiak and my TQ6 throttle quadrant, it took a bit of time to find the detent between idle and beta.) Maybe there are some beta testers out there with TQ6 throttle quadrants (or Bravo quadrants) who can answer this for me.

 

I haven’t seen anyone go into beta in any of the videos I have seen and I think that low beta is sometimes used during taxi because the engines are overpowered. 

 

If this has been asked and answered, I apologize.

John.

How did you setup the beta range in mfs?

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