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Cheyenne II surface deice


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That's just like the real thing. It's a spring loaded switch that starts a de-ice cycle (I don't remember how long it was). After the cycle is complete you can start a new one by pressing the de-ice switch again.

I think Piper did this as a measure against overheating of the de-icing equipment.

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Deicing is a rubber boot on the leading edge of the wings. It is necessary to get ice on the wings first, at least 1/2 inch. The deice cycle pumps air into the rubber boots, expanding them, and causing the ice to break and fall away. Pretty simple old system and it still works fairly well. :)

If you repeatedly cycle the boots without giving the ice a chance to build up first, it breaks off in small pieces and pretty soon you wind up with ice building up beyond the reach of the expanding boot, rendering them pretty worthless.

Best thing really for ice is climbing out of it quickly and minimizing time in it on descent. That's usually enough for a pretty capable turboprop like the Cheyenne. I've flown them a little, King Airs and C-441 a lot more, and most of the time you're up into air too cold for ice (around -15 degrees C) pretty soon. Flew the Conquest for about 5 years in all kinds of weather and truthfully never had to cycle the boots.

BTW, really enjoying the Cheyenne, Hans, even with the few little bugs. Flight model is really good.

cheers,

steve :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just to be more specific. The switch remains in the ON position for 6 seconds. During this period, all boots are inflated ( wings, horizontal stabilizer and vertical stabilizer ). A blue surface de-ice light should also iluminate when the pressure in the boots reach 18 psi.

:wink:

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