Jump to content

CRJisBAE

members
  • Content Count

    8
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

1 Follower

About CRJisBAE

  • Rank
    Flight Student - Groundwork

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Where I am, takeoff flaps are decided by the company and our ACARS/Flight release data just tells us which setting we are usuing. But more often than not in the 700/900 it seems to be flaps 8. For landing flaps we use flaps 45 every time.
  2. Ahhh descent planning. This could be a 50 page thread by itself, lol. For now I'll just hit on what you asked. Our typical decent profile is .77 to 320kts, then 250kts below 10,000. As you can imagine, going into the major airports, we rarely are able to stick with that profile because of altitude/speed restraints on the arrival, or ATC assigned altitudes and speeds. An idle descent where you don't add power until final approach would be the most efficient in any jet, however, this pretty much never happens, once again, because of the restrictions of the arrival or ATC. So the thrust settings are just whatever you need to comply with that you've been assigned. The vast majority of people descend in V/S mode, and just adjust it to maintain the speed that you want to hold. Going into places like Chicago, they typically assign you speeds to hold all the way down to the final appraoch fix (Maintain 300kts....maintain 250kts....maintain 210kts....maintain 180 kts....maintain 170kts until *Insert final approach fix here*). There are times where I don't feel like riding the V/S knob the whole way down the descent so instead I'll just slow to the assigned speed and use SPEED mode to come down. There are no specific thrust settings I use when I do this. If I want a shallow descent, I pull them back a little. The more steep of a descent I want, the more I pull the thrust levers back. As with any descent in the CRJ, make sure you get that power back in once you level off!) A little trick you can do for those times where ATC leaves you way high and dry and you need to get down quickly. 320-330kts (250kts below 10), SPEED mode, thrust idle, speedbrakes full out, then hold on tight (lol). (Again...make sure you stow the speedbrakes and get the power back in on the level off! Otherwise you will experience CRJ fun times!) I'm sure we'll get more questions about descent planning as this goes on and we'll cover more of this, but hopefully this gives you a good start.
  3. More times than not the aircraft is powered up, whether it's via external power or the APU. However there are many times where you do have to power it up from cold and dark, like the first flight of the day, or if the last crew was already gone by the time you got there.
  4. Welcome to the annoying world of CRJ, haha. If it makes you feel any better, there is RARELY a flight where we can just set the power in cruise and it stays locked on the speed we want. In reality, we do have to make small inputs and corrections over the duration of the flight to maintain a certain speed. Once you get up there, though, the power changes needed shouldn't be drastic, just minor corrections. We do not do RNP approaches at my airline but for RNAV you nailed it. We track the course in NAV and use V/S for the descent. In the real plane (not sure if it's modeled in the aerosoft or not), if the RNAV approach is loaded in the FMS, you will get a white "snowflake" on the right of your attitude indicator. This is essentially your "rnav glideslode", and you treat the exact same as you would an ILS glideslope. Also, we have the vertical guidance on the top right of our MFD that tells us the exact FPM to descend to stay on the calculated glideslope. So if the Vertical guidance says 800fpm, we dial in an 800fpm descent with the V/S knob. If it then switches to 900fpm, we dial in the V/S knob to 900fpm. This typically isn't a set it an forget it type thing. It's constantly changing about +-100 FPM to hold the glidepath. Also, if you don't want to use all the fancy stuff, you can go old school and use the Groundspeed/Descent rate chart on the approach plate. BONUS: There are many times where we will use the NAV and V/S method for an ILS as well (as opposed to just using APPR mode). Going into major airports like Chicago, ATC likes to keep the spacing as tight as possible to get as many planes in and out as they can. There have been many times where we've encountered the wake turbulence of a bigger jet in front of us. If we know they are putting us behind one of these planes on the approach, we'll typically want to stay one dot high on the glideslope so we avoid the wake. Since APPR mode can only track the glideslope dead on, we will use V/S mode and keep adjusting it to keep ourselves one dot above the glidepath. No clue. It's silly to me too, lol.
  5. Hey guys. I am a real world CRJ driver for a US Airline. I've been an avid flight simmer since I was young, and though I don't really fire up the sim anymore, it has helped me tremendously in my flight training and throughout my flying career. The biggest thing I remember is flying the study level sims, and wondering if this is how they do it in the real airplane. It was difficult to find real world tips and techniques on how to fly the planes. So I'm taking the opportunity to give back a little to a community that has helped me out a ton. So with that said... If you guys have any questions about CRJ techniques (Do they do it like this in the real world? Best way to ______, etc), ask them here and I will get back here periodically to answer as many of them as best I can. DISCLAIMER...I do not own this product so I obviously can't offer support for the product and I have no idea what all is and isn't modeled in the sim. I will just do my best to explain how the real plane does it and my personal tips and tricks that I've picked up. And if there are other real world CRJ pilots on here, please chime in and offer your tips and tricks as well! Looking forward to your questions!
  6. I fly the CRJ 200, 700, and 900 in the real world. All variants of the plane, when accelerating in SPEED mode, do exactly as @Jm8592 describes. It will pitch over to nearly level, only getting about a 100-200 fpm climb, accelerate to the selected speed, and then pitch up to hold that speed. If the Aerosoft CRJ is still getting 3000fpm during the acceleration process, that's extremely unrealistic, and not at all like the behavior of the real world airplane.
  7. This is not true. The real CRJ can absolutely fly ground based naviad SIDS, STARS, and approaches using white needles (FMS Navigation). As a matter of fact, it is how we do it 99% of the time. The only time we use green needles (the old fashion way of tuning the navaids and tracking the courses) is if we have been cleared for a legitimate ILS approach (Not a visual backed up with an ILS), OR if the FMS (most of our CRJ's only have one) is deferred.
×
×
  • Create New...