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gary.mcginnis

Class II/B343/B043 Flight Planning Guidance

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Hello all:
As promised, here is some guidance on the new flight planning features of PFPX version 1.14.
Purpose
The purpose of this forum post is the give you a working knowledge of Class II airspace and how to use the new fuel policies. Please note that B043, B343, and B343/B043, along with Class II airspace, are only applicable to US certified airlines (hence why "US" is in the fuel policy title).
Class II Airspace
Let us first start with understanding what Class II airspace actually is. In a simplistic definition, Class II airspace is any airspace outside the standard service volume (SSV) of a navigation aid. The navigation aids are ground based and include the NDB. Please notice how I said "ground based" in the previous sentence! I did this because I was approached by a friend asking if GPS (integrated into the FMC or a GPS unit) counted as a navaid. The answer is NO. As of the current definition of Class II airspace, GPS does not count as a navaid. This will probably change in the coming years as aviation continues to make the shift towards GPS based navigation however.
What is the SSV? It is the maximum distance you can receive the navaid signal based on distance.
Class II Airspace and PFPX
One of the ideas I wanted to implement was Class II airspace flight planning before PFPX was initially released. However, after a few meetings, it was agreed to shelve this feature until after release (as part of an update). Over that time Doug Snow, Chrisitan, and myself were able to come up with a very simple and easy to use method of Class II airspace plotting and planning. Follow the one step below to configure PFPX.
1) Go to your planning units section (Program Options>Planning Units) and verify PFPX has the Class II airspace parameters set as shown below.
1_zps88f62bc3.jpg
Now PFPX is configured to plot Class II airspace visually on your map and also calculate the time inside Class II airspace when using either US B043 or US B343+043 fuel policies. The airspace plot is accessed by pushing the "II" button along the top, next to the wind barb.
2_zps096e2261.jpg
Fuel Policies
There are three (3) new fuel policies that have been included in v1.14. Two are for Class II airspace calculations and the other is a 10% reduction. Verify they are configured as follows (Fuel Policy Editor):
US B343
- Burn
- Alternate (if required)
- 5% of trip time
> This is the change from standard FAR Flag (10%) flight planning
- 30 minutes (1500' AGL)
Capture_zps27ae218c.jpg
US B043
- Burn
- Alternate (if required)
- 10% of flight time in Class II airspace
> This is the change from standard FAR Flag (10%) flight planning
- 45 minutes (1500' AGL)
> This is the change from standard FAR Flag (10%) flight planning
b043_zps788f133d.jpg
US B343/B043
- Burn
- Alternate (if required)
- 5% of flight time in Class II airspace
> This is the change from standard FAR Flag (10%) flight planning
- 45 minutes (1500' AGL)
> This is the change from standard FAR Flag (10%) flight planning
b343b043_zps00a51c95.jpg
Final Remarks
Please know this information is not a be-all end-all tutorial. It is meant to give you a working knowledge of this new PFPX feature and encourage greater personal research into the subject. For those wondering where the B343, B043, and B343/B043 numbers came from, they are simply the OP SPEC numbers that are associated with these approvals. In addition, these fuel policies are only used for flights with both an origin and destination not within the 48 contiguous states. Finally, some might wonder what the point of this type of fuel planning is. Simply put it is an alternative to standard Flag flight planning that will allow reduced enroute reserves. This is a similar theory to re-dispatch but much simpler.
Thanks for reading,
Gary McGinnis

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Thanks for the info. Quick question. I read that only American and United use B343, are companies also allowed to use either B343, B043, or B343+043 as required or can they only use standard flag and have only one of those as an alternative.

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Hi,

I am not sure of the question exactly.

These methods are open for any US airline to apply for.

The airlines can get as many of these OP OPECS as they see fit. Maybe AA and UA are the only ones who see the need for B343 right now. I am not sure on every airline's OP SPECS. Said another way, the airline could in theory apply/have the following:

- B044: Re-Dispatch
- B043: !0% of Class II

- B343: 5%
- B343/B043: 5% of Class II
- A012: Extended Domestic

Gary

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Hi,

I am not sure of the question exactly.

These methods are open for any US airline to apply for.

Actually no they arent. B343 is only usable by AA and UA, and the FAA at the OpSpecs working group meetings has said that no one else may have it.

They also said that in accordance with the new ICAO Annex 6, which legitimizes a statistical fuel model, that the new B343 will be called "Performance Based Fuel", might hit the streets a year or so from now. Under the new B343, you'll plan to land with the 30 minute flag hold, fuel to an alternate, and the statistical contingency fuel which would prevent burning into reserves by a significant order of probability.

Nonscheduled operators without a significant statistical fuel burn history will need not apply.

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My God,

the US fuel policies are SO complicated. Just as I was starting wrap my head around Re-Dispatch, this comes along. And as a professional airline pilot I fail to see how Class II airspace in today's world affects sector fuel. But then again I am a simple pilot. The EU OPS system is much more logical and I think has never failed. Notwithstanding, it is AMAZING how much I have learned through the FS Community that you don't get to see in line operations.

My hats off and thanks go out to you guys at FlightSimSoft and all others who make the FS world as good as it is today.

Xander Koote

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tcasclimb Op Specs are a unique agreement between each airline and The FAA in The United States. Each company has it's own set that varies from company to company. It get's really confusing really quickly! In this case it sounds like this fuel policy is only in The United and American Ops Specs. Cheers Gary for implamenting this. What a cool feature!

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