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  1. 85 points
    Ahhh descent planning. This could be a 50 page thread by itself, lol. For now I'll just hit on what you asked. Our typical decent profile is .77 to 320kts, then 250kts below 10,000. As you can imagine, going into the major airports, we rarely are able to stick with that profile because of altitude/speed restraints on the arrival, or ATC assigned altitudes and speeds. An idle descent where you don't add power until final approach would be the most efficient in any jet, however, this pretty much never happens, once again, because of the restrictions of the arrival or ATC. So the thrust settings are just whatever you need to comply with that you've been assigned. The vast majority of people descend in V/S mode, and just adjust it to maintain the speed that you want to hold. Going into places like Chicago, they typically assign you speeds to hold all the way down to the final appraoch fix (Maintain 300kts....maintain 250kts....maintain 210kts....maintain 180 kts....maintain 170kts until *Insert final approach fix here*). There are times where I don't feel like riding the V/S knob the whole way down the descent so instead I'll just slow to the assigned speed and use SPEED mode to come down. There are no specific thrust settings I use when I do this. If I want a shallow descent, I pull them back a little. The more steep of a descent I want, the more I pull the thrust levers back. As with any descent in the CRJ, make sure you get that power back in once you level off!) A little trick you can do for those times where ATC leaves you way high and dry and you need to get down quickly. 320-330kts (250kts below 10), SPEED mode, thrust idle, speedbrakes full out, then hold on tight (lol). (Again...make sure you stow the speedbrakes and get the power back in on the level off! Otherwise you will experience CRJ fun times!) I'm sure we'll get more questions about descent planning as this goes on and we'll cover more of this, but hopefully this gives you a good start.
  2. 63 points
    Because the previous topic was old, contained a lot of nonsense etc I decided to make a new one. How many products are this? And what will be the names? Aerosoft A318/A319 Professional Aerosoft A320/A321 Professional Aerosoft A330 Professional The 'Professional' in the title indicates that the product is developed for P3d V4 and partly for the professional market (did you know we sold over 75 educational licenses?). This 64 bit platform is our main development platform and our main market. We are sorry that this might lead to some confusion. In scenery we only use the term 'Professional' for products that are designed for P3d V4 and are ONLY P3D V4 compatible. They are not the same products as the FSX:SP2, FSX:STEAM, P3D V3 versions. For aircraft they basically ARE the same. One product, one buy and you can install as many times on any compatible sim (as long as it is your sim and not that of a friend). In other words, you buy the P3D v4 version and get the FSX:SP2, FSX:STEAM, and P3D V3 version for free. A bit complex, sorry about that. Are these updates of the old version? No, they are fully new builds. The 32 bits versions had some code in it that was close to 7 years old and was holding us back. So we decided to redo a lot of the modules and graphics to modern standards. Around 60% of the modeling and textures are new and more then 75% of the code is new. So they probably are not free updates, right? Indeed. But as always Aerosoft will never charge you double for anything. If we replace 50 of a product the update will only cost you half the new price. I this case it's even better because we if you own the A318/A319/A320/A321 and want the newer versions you will be offered an update price of 16.95 Euro (plus VAT when applicable). If you want the A330 and have any of the older models we might be able to offer you an discount as well, not 100% sure on that. The full versions will cost just under 50 Euro. We still have to decide on the update and full prices of possible bundles. Will be okay. Of course prices can always change. When will they be released? Next week? No. The 64 bit version of the A318/A319/A320 and A321 will come first (because we got so many customers of those who want 64 bit versions). That will probably this year. The A330 (32 and 64 bit versions) will be next, early next year, the 32 bit A318/A319/A320/A321 after that. [15.11.2017] Please read an update on this here! DRM? Online activation? Of course not. You paid for the files and can do with them (on your own systems) as you want. Wingflex? On the smaller busses not (we simply have never seen the high frequency very small movements of the wings done well, they are remarkably stiff wings) and adding it just adds a load of complexity and development cost. Of course the A330 has wingflex, it has much larger and much less stiff wings.
  3. 63 points
    I sent the final files to AS today. We're going to test the final installer tomorrow. Release will be tomorrow late afternoon (EU TZ) earliest but more likely Wednesday morning. The CRJ doesn't come with free replacement F5 keys btw.
  4. 61 points
    Been a long while since I wrote a friday evening update mail but it's time to explain a few things. It's 18:20 and I got my glass of wine so let's get going. It will be about the CRJ, A320 series and the A330, they are all highly interlinked at this moment. As you know the magic word of the last two weeks was '64 bits' (okay, two words). And most of my time was focusses on getting 'my' products converted. My products as in the series of Aerosoft products I am responsible for. We had some issues but at least some scenery and aircraft like the Twin Otter etc are released in 64 bit versions. Of course the big projects like the old and new Airbusses are not that easy. Not only because they are more complex but also because they get more attention and we do not want to do straight ports but real P3D V4 versions with all the lights etc. The plan was to 'quickly' do the A318/A319 and A320/A321 and release them in 64 bit versions with (apart from all new lights) the same features as the current versions. But reality quickly raised its dirty head and we had to change the plans. See, because of some unfinished parts in P3d V4 the lights have to be done partly in code and not in effects. Lockheed is working on these issues but we think that doing the in code will be a better solution anyway. To give you an idea, if you do the in effects you have to change the model and recompile it for every test (often dozens to get something right), if you do it in code you just need to recompile the gauge and that's done in seconds and not 15 minutes as with the model. That means that if you feel the lights are too yellow or something it's an easy fix. But of course that means opening major parts of the source files. And that means the developers had to get re-acquainted with code they left two years ago. And of course they felt the new code that replaced it by now (for the A330) was way better then that old 'junk'. So after a lot of teeth grinding I (as project manager) decided to replace a lot of the old code that served us well for close to 6 years now (!) and use the newer codebase for the A320 series update. Project Managers always want it 'cheap, fast and stable' and we mostly settle for two of the three. This time we choose only 'stable'. It made no sense to release an update for the A320 series now and to overhaul it end of this year again. We have to move these projects to our new shared code base that handles all the Airbusses with one set of files, only with different config files. Just as Airbus does it actually. Now don't worry, this does NOT really delay the A330. The code still needs to be done for all models and as you have seen today the modeling is progressing nicely. The release and the massive demand for compatible add-ons for Prepar3D does affect all our schedules. I honestly told everybody in Aerosoft it would be big but even I am seriously surprised. Never a dull moment.... Damn, it seems these glasses of wine keep getting smaller every year, be right back. Where was I? Ahh right... As said the A330 is not really delayed, but the release order is. We were planning to do a new A320 series after the A330 but demand for the 64 bit version is so strong that we simply have to get things out as soon as possible. And that path is shorter for the A320 series then for the A330. So you will see updates for the A18/A319 and A320/A321 in the next few weeks first. Those will be full blown P3d V4 products. With all the lights (every single light can be controlled individually), installer that install in the documents folder etc (very cool btw, you can re-install the sim without re-installing the add-ons). The works. You will also get almost all of the aircraft systems in the new versions. As explained we dropped all the old code and rewrote most of it to the latest standards. It's faster, slicker, has far deeper sense of the systems behind what you see. You will get an MCDU that is, beyond any doubt, the most complete ever done for our sims (and yes that includes all our competitors). We spend a lot of time on that because as you know we focus on what pilots use and not on systems that have been only oned a few times (or never) in real life. The MCDU is the heart of the Airbus and no effort spend on that is too much. What it also means is that our idea to release this as a free update is out of the windows. You know that we would never ask you to pay twice for the same files but we had the idea that just new lights and a new installer did not justify an update fee. But now we are talking rather serious stuff. There is around 2 men year of work between what you have no on your disk and the new files. So we'll do what we always do, make the files, see what's new and what's old and come up with a update fee that's reasonable. My CEO will disagree, he will take my advice, lol. The A330 will follow pretty fast after those aircraft. And of course if you have the one (or all) of the A320 series you will get an discount because it shares some of the files. Again, we never ask you to pay twice for the same files. And of course it will come in FSX/P3d V3 versions that are similar and P3d V4 version that will have all the additional features. As we see it now the price will be the same for those versions. Of course the CRJ is still planned to be released before the busses. Please note we have NO plans to drop support for 32 bit sims at this moment. All the while Flight Sim World is very slowly getting some updates in it's Early Access stage but we still do not have an SDK and no good idea about the stability of that platform. As there seems to be zero demand from customers at this moment, we are more or less leaving that simulator where it is now. 19:10 now, been working since 08:20. Time for some food and then finish watching House of Cards Season 5. If you got any questions feel free to ask them here. I promise to answer them as honest and open as possible.
  5. 60 points
    Small friday update: Work on the galley detailing advances nicely. Galley1 almost complete (Still needs trolleys and casing of the kitches painted). Other galleys follow detailing...
  6. 55 points
    Time for a small friday update: Work on the forward cargo hold is so far completed. Now work concentrates on the aft section one. All walls are covered with the detail that belongs there...
  7. 55 points
    Another test flight finished. This time I made a short hop from EDDF to EDDM to test the new step climb feature and holding entries that the A330 will have. Be aware that this is early alpha and there is still room for improvement.
  8. 53 points
    A sneak peak from a testflight I just made: This is an early build with some pieces not yet in place and more late alpha than early beta. And watch it in 4K please.
  9. 53 points
    Small friday update: Gearbay have now been integrated into the fuselage with a basic coloring, details come later. Next task is to create the final cargo hold geometry...
  10. 53 points
    Small friday update: FlapTrack Fairings are now completed too. Details on the trailing wing edge + spoiler details have been also added. Last part in that section are the hydraulic pipelines for the spoiler system. Then the closing touch will be the rivets/screws on the trail edge top access panel. Last thing to do then is here the slatsystem in detail, which will follow hopefully next week.
  11. 50 points
    Small friday update again: Galley detailing continues; this time master templates for the kitchen equipment itself were created and can be now spread over all three galley sections (ovens, waterbasin/sink, coffeemaker, chillers, trolley sized cabinets, trolleys, trash compactors...) So the kitchen will really look like their real world versions. Research was also done for the coming different external models for other operating airlines. Lufthansa for example will get a model on its own, featuring the large aft antenna fairing they installed there as optional add. So we stay very close the real thing there too.
  12. 49 points
    Time for a small friday update: A warning up in front: The cockpit is currently a somewhat "messy" construction site. There are still a lot of old components which are exchanged piece by piece with new ones. Work concentrates on the functional stuff like important panels currently. The overhead has been replaced now and is back in action. The images show the complete list of the button lights now; all there are existing. Mainpanel has been refreshed and modeling is already completed on the new pedestal stuff which starts texturing next week. Also the displays are old ones from the last version as i not immediately take the new BETA stuff onto my machine. Higher resolution is planned also there... The older textures for FSX also needed to be much brighter in the more remote spots. Prepar3D V4 with HDR features that much better, with simulating the eye opening / exposure time dynamicly.
  13. 46 points
    Last update October 24, new items shown like this. This is NOT a complete list but we'll try to keep it up to date. Keep in mind that the order of conversion depends on many things. Please note that these are plans, not promises. Aerosoft A320/A321 Edition 2018 tbd Full P3D V4 features Aerosoft A318/A319 Edition 2018 tbd Full P3D V4 features Aerosoft A330 Edition 2018 tbd Full P3D V4 features Airport Avatars Available Added specific model with flashlight Aspen Extended Available Straight port Balearen X Evolution Available Straight port Bergen X Available Partly P3D V4 features Berlin Tegel Pro Available Full P3D V4 features Bronco X Available Straight port (uses P3d V4 installer options) Ciampino X Available Partly P3D V4 features (P3D V4 compiler) CRJ X Available Full P3D V4 features Discus K Available Straight port FS Commander Available ** GAP Bremen Pro November Full P3D V4 features GAP Dortmund Pro November Full P3D V4 features GAP Friedrichshafen Pro Available Full P3D V4 features GAP Mega Airport Frankfurt Pro Available Full P3D V4 features German Airports - Stuttgart Pro Available Full P3D V4 features Genoa X Available Straight port (P3D V4 compiler) Sim-wings Gibraltar Pro Available Full P3D V4 features Ibiza X Evolution Available Straight port Ju 52 tbd Full P3D V4 features Kilimanjaro X Available Straight port Lukla X Mount Everest Available Straight port Madeira X Evolution Available Full P3D V4 features Malaga X Available Straight port Mallorca X Evolution Available Straight port Menorca X Evolution Available Straight port Mega Airport Barcelona Pro Available Full P3D V4 features Mega Airport Heathrow Pro Available Full P3D V4 features Mega Airport Rome Available Partly P3D V4 features Mega Airport Oslo Available Straight Port Mega Airport Zurich Pro Available Full P3D V4 features Milan Malpensa X Available Partly P3D V4 features Napoli X Available Full P3D V4 features PBY Catalina Available Straight port Sim-wings La Palma Pro Avialable Full P3D V4 features SimStarter NG Available Many new features Spanish Airfields: Requena X Available Straight port Spanish Airfields: Soria X Available Straight port Tromso X Available Partly P3D V4 features Trondheim X-Vaernes V2 Available Full P3d V4 features Twin Otter Extended Available Straight port Valencia X Available Straight port Wilga X Available Straight port ** FlightSim Commander Version 9.6 Revision 9 is, under certain conditions, compatible with Prepar3D V4. Requirement: The new and up-to-date FSUIPC5 5.1x from Pete Dowson is required for error-free connection and function of FlightSim Commander with Prepar3D V4. Limitations: FlightSim Commander Version 9.6 Revision 9 currently only identifies Add-On sceneries whose installation path was correctly entered in the file scenery.cfg located in the C:\ProgramData\Lockheed Martin\Prepar3D v4 folder. The F-16 Fighting Falcon has moved to the default simulator and will not be provided as a P3d V4 add-ons from us. We will provide the liveries and models that do not make it into the simulator. In the release candidate the manual for the F-16 is missing. You will find it as an attachment to this post. manual.pdf
  14. 46 points
    Time for a small friday update again: The galley and cockpit interior is now inserted and functional too (door animations). I made some images within FSX which show the different looks between day and night. The pax window itself are still work and progress and get their passenger heads and seats visible one after another. Dont wait for an update next week as i am shortly working on another project. Cargo holds are then the next stop which are luckily much less complex constructions than the galleys...
  15. 45 points
    As Mathijs already stated the AS A330 is in early alpha. I just did my first testflight from EDDM with it and I really like it sofar. The VC has a lot of 2048 textures now and all the text on the panels is so much sharper than with the AS A320Fam. The displays are also hires but Mathijs just told me that they will get an even higher resolution soon. Here are 3 quick shots from the cockpit flying the BIBAG1S SID: Do note this is early alpha.
  16. 45 points
    Time for a small friday update: Work resides now on the detailing of the lower wing sections. Current focus is on the flap track fairings; the innermost got already some detail. Any rivet or drain hole also exists on the real plane. The wing was photographed meter for meter to cover any feature. Number and place of the details represents the real thing.
  17. 44 points
    Btw, we have now entered out Airbus projects into our administrative systems, here is the info. Aerosoft A320/A321, Edition 2018 Aerosoft A318/A319, Edition 2018 Aerosoft A318/A319 & A320/A321, Edition 2018 (bundle) Aerosoft A330, Edition 2018 These products will sell for 40 euro (plus EU VAT when applicable). Price for the bundle still need to be set. These products will install in FSX:SP2, FSX;STEAM, P3D V3 and P3D V4. No online activation, as many installs as you want in what ever sim you want. Updates from the current Airbusses will be 16 Euro (plus EU VAT when applicable). A note on that, as you know we never charge customers for files they already paid for, so if an update contains 50% new files, you only pay for those new files and get a 50% discount. In the case of the A320 series the new product actually contains more than 60% new files, yet we decided to charge much less. This is done because we value the customers who have been using these products for such a long time. Still need to figure out the update price for the bundle but expect it to be in line with the others. All these products will release this year, (CRJ first) where the A330 follows on the A320 series. we expect these all to be released shortly after each other. Please keep in mind that these are NOT new installers to install the old product in the new sims to make them 'compatible'. They are all very much updated to the latest ideas and technologies.
  18. 44 points
    Time for a small friday update: Galleys are now almost complete; only some very small details left for the doors interior itself and after that a fast nightlighting pass. As easter egg a compilation of the three main galleys. The geometry is rather light, only where you see really major corners a larger single surface ends. Also the texture is rather efficient, the pixels wisely used. But i personally see a time coming, were the door of the aircraft and surrounding will more cross each worlds than it was in past. So you can set at least a step into the aircraft maybe (dont ask for a complete cabin yet), while of course it cant be that detailed like in the cockpit. Of course we are exploring any time we have the chance new techniques. So have alltogether a nice easter time and relax a bit; i will now also retire for this weekend...
  19. 42 points
  20. 42 points
    Gents, let me make a statement on the release schedule. The statement is, I simply do not know. The main reason for that is that the platforms are in flux at this moment. NDA's prevent us from making a more detailed statement but it will surprise nobody when I say that a lot of the work we are doing right now is not aimed at 32 bit platforms. It is my personal belief (not shared by everybody in Aerosoft btw) that 32 bit sims will die very soon when we get 64 bit platforms to work with. X-Plane showed that without a doubt. Will we release our Airbusses and CRJ for FSX:SP2, FSX:STEAM and P3d V3? Sure. No doubt about that, they will be as good as we can make them. Am I in a hurry to get them out while not not knowing what the dominant platform will be in 12 months time? Mwahhh.... of course I want these products to start selling as soon as feasible, but we need to explore these new platforms as fast as possible to be able to get products that you will buy in 2018. And these explorations need to be done by our most experienced staff, the people now working on these aircraft. What we will NOT do however is rush something to market because the platform might fall out from under us. Aerosoft is a 'big' company. These aircraft projects are important to use but they are just a small part of all the software we release. We do not need the money from them to stay afloat as is most certainly the case for some of our colleague publishers. Every bit of the work that we do on the busses is aimed at creating a code base that we can build on. A code base that will make it easy for us to create a line of high quality Airbus add-ons that we can sell for a reasonable price. We very much follow the idea of Airbus Industries here, create the base and them make big and small aircraft all using the same code. That's why Airbus calls it a family, something Boeing tries to do but never gets right. Of course I got a release date in mind for the A330, A320/A321 and A318/A319 projects. But that date changes day by day and I am calling myself damned lucky to work with a team and a CEO that (most of the time) understands that. What I can tell you is that things look great, not only for our products, but for the hobby as a whole.
  21. 42 points
    Time for a small update: Tail detailes beside wear and tear have been finalized now for the A333. Note that the rudder construction is not perfectly symmetrical by basic design, as there is a different maint access opening on the left of the rudder hinge. On checking many images i also could witness how different the A330-200s vertical tail construction is. Like on the A318 it was heigthened and deepened to encounter the different aerodynamical situation that comes with the shortened total length of the aircraft. Work now moves to the last large exterior: The wings. The slats are rather detailed by rivets and inward structures, but that will be displayed. Of course such a huge thing is not completed within 5 work days (also there has to be done research for every meter to put the panels, weldlines and rivets on the right places), but i will keep you all informed on how things go. For now enjoy this weeks images; even the rivet works should be rather near the real thing on the APU and vertical tail section. On Dudley´s post: There will be a detailed paintkit manual and of course people can reach me via the messaging function in this forum!
  22. 41 points
    TIme for the friday update: How you can imagine the CRJ took also a part of my attention during this week. Nevertheless advance was good: The overhead details are now also fully intergrated and the status labels for all panels have been redone in higher resolution. As the A318-A321 project is now more modular and features may still be added in future, the indicator light labels are now completely existing. So any single one which was maybe missing in the old version is now included. On the small overhead fusepanel there is a large button collection in the upper right corner. I had no actual footage with knob status lights on there. If one of the "ON"s has a wrong color (they are sometimes white or blue), please report, i will change that then immediately!
  23. 41 points
    Time for a little friday update! You have already seen some images from a sidepath i had to take this week (coffeepot, napkins, cellphone etc...). Those geometry/textures are encapsulated. If you dont want them to show, you loose no system performance/texture memory. And for those who want to see them: They are very optimized. As i told last week the slat arms were finally to make and they are finished new. Examine the little rasterlike track on the back arc of the arms: There the slat geardrive buries in its teeths, to get grip pulling and pushing on the arms. Over a system of cylindrical rolls on each arms base, the whole thing is kept in balance during movement. Left to work on is only some riveting for the stringers/flaps. The stringers are the connections between the main ribs of the wing. They are thin bands of metal below the outer surface, which keep the structure of the wing body stable, while at the same moment being flexible for up- and downward flex. However the flex on the A330 wing is gradual. The most you will see starting at the end of the spoiler section to the wingtip; logically at the thinnest parts without special enforced sections. Still doing the stringer rivets now (which cover the most part of the lower wing center between the main spars). Next week cleanup of the wing texture pages and again some pictures from within the sim. Was simply faster to shoot the images from within the 3dsoftware (but that creates some blurries when you look at narrow angles at the geometry - that is for fast drawing during work on that piece; dont worry - it will be still sharp when we see it in the sim itself).
  24. 41 points
    Time for a small update again: This works week concentrated on the detailing of slats and its direct surroundings. Only the connection arms of the outer slat and de-icing scopes need still work, which is just yet happen after the post is sent. So the clean works on the wing are nearing its end (diryting comes how already told later) and the work moves then forward to the "interiors" of the external model: First thing is the reverser section which is a much smaller place luckyly and then the main gearbay in all its glory. After that only the cargo holds and galleys are left to do...
  25. 40 points
    Mega Airport Singapore X (by Antti Haka), It's still some way off but we thought it would be nice to share some first images!
  26. 40 points
    And here we go with the updates for this week Dudley! You did saw some post from Mathijs already of the "paperwork" which was to do for the throttle levers. Beside the wings are finished now (sigh) and the focus moved over to the thrust reverser section on the engines. It´s progressed rather far already, only the details on the outer sides of the doors have to be added next week. There is some more complex paneling located. After that work will focus on the maingearbays. Two pictures come from FSX, the rest (for my convinience) directly from within the 3dsoftware.
  27. 39 points
    Time for the friday update! This week was focused on creating the geometry for the cargo hold and the corresponding door interiors. Also all the guides and clamps for the containers you can witness on the entries. Also all three doors are available, including the bulk cargo section. Texturing has to wait again here like with the gearbay, as primarily now all the final geometry has to be done. The last large part will be the galleys and pax doors, which have been already started today. Once this is in place, all the final painting begins...
  28. 39 points
    Time for a small update out of the regular intervalls! Today we have thursday not friday, but from tomorrow on i say goodbye and go onto my holiday vacation. No, we not have more holidays than average here starting so early into XMAS, but i moved my days at the end of the year. Summer is also nice at home, why then move many ours into more hot sun even? To the pictures: How stated the wing detailing started. As the wise artist fixes at first the rough scheme, little things like rivets and lines/rubber seals on the fairing is still to do. Also the spoiler not got his fully detail yet. Enjoy the pictures and happy XMAS / good new year...
  29. 38 points
    Time for a small friday update! Aft Cargo Bay is so far done. As i just recieved good photos for the bulkcargo section this gets a bit more attention at monday... The cargo door itself features also bump mapping, so with being in the sim later is will appear pretty plasticly. When stuff is alltogether done, i will post some images also with the night versions.
  30. 38 points
    Time for a small update: The wing top surfaces was covered with details this week, from wingtip to wingroot several thousands of them... Current place of work is the wing leading edge and after that the slats, which will be shown next week.
  31. 35 points
    Time for a small firday update: ThrustReverser Section is now done and work is moving over to the maingearbay.
  32. 34 points
    As promised I report on the weekly progress meeting of the team (most are now back from vacation). The updating of the A320 VC modeling is progressing very nicely. Stefan is shaving of a lot of polygons and using the latest insights in optimization so the resulting model is really more efficient (meaning faster) and smaller (better for the 32 bit sims) while looking better. It's amazing what progress we all made in three years. The systems are all inserted now and will go into the first test cycle this week. As explained almost all code has been replaced by better versions that more deeply simulates the systems and how they react to each other and the environment. We still do bother a lot with events that have either never happened or are only proven to happen ones in 20 million flight hours (like a dual engine failure) but the better system and interaction does allow you to experiment with the systems more than before. The MCDU has a few issues left but is getting there. It's the heart of the aircraft and a massive investment in time and effort has been done in that. It simulates a modern version with all the features pilots of the more affluent airlines expect. It's unrivalled in its completeness and depth. So all in all I'm pretty happy, it's still painful not to have the A320 out in 64 bits at this moment but as explained, it simply was a better decision. Of course all this work is actually relevant for the A330, we are now actually working with a single code base for all busses and it is only configuration files that determine for what aircraft it is (exactly as Airbus Industries does things).
  33. 34 points
    I gave you exactly as much information as I intended. Asking for more won't get you anywhere. because we're currently discussing A320 series high altitude takeoffs in the CRJ forum. If you want to talk A330, please use the Pilatus PC-6 preview forum
  34. 33 points
    Welcome to the annoying world of CRJ, haha. If it makes you feel any better, there is RARELY a flight where we can just set the power in cruise and it stays locked on the speed we want. In reality, we do have to make small inputs and corrections over the duration of the flight to maintain a certain speed. Once you get up there, though, the power changes needed shouldn't be drastic, just minor corrections. We do not do RNP approaches at my airline but for RNAV you nailed it. We track the course in NAV and use V/S for the descent. In the real plane (not sure if it's modeled in the aerosoft or not), if the RNAV approach is loaded in the FMS, you will get a white "snowflake" on the right of your attitude indicator. This is essentially your "rnav glideslode", and you treat the exact same as you would an ILS glideslope. Also, we have the vertical guidance on the top right of our MFD that tells us the exact FPM to descend to stay on the calculated glideslope. So if the Vertical guidance says 800fpm, we dial in an 800fpm descent with the V/S knob. If it then switches to 900fpm, we dial in the V/S knob to 900fpm. This typically isn't a set it an forget it type thing. It's constantly changing about +-100 FPM to hold the glidepath. Also, if you don't want to use all the fancy stuff, you can go old school and use the Groundspeed/Descent rate chart on the approach plate. BONUS: There are many times where we will use the NAV and V/S method for an ILS as well (as opposed to just using APPR mode). Going into major airports like Chicago, ATC likes to keep the spacing as tight as possible to get as many planes in and out as they can. There have been many times where we've encountered the wake turbulence of a bigger jet in front of us. If we know they are putting us behind one of these planes on the approach, we'll typically want to stay one dot high on the glideslope so we avoid the wake. Since APPR mode can only track the glideslope dead on, we will use V/S mode and keep adjusting it to keep ourselves one dot above the glidepath. No clue. It's silly to me too, lol.
  35. 33 points
    Oh yes... try flying these procedures... As I recently said in a presentation, when our customers see these issues they close the sim and start to write an angry post on the forum. A real pilot digs up a paper chart, disables the AP and starts to fly the aircraft. Probably enjoying himself and feeling smug.
  36. 33 points
    Some small addition i maybe have: In shorter moments i had time to add the floor detail to the FWD Cargo. Any detail should be in there, that exists also in real world: Ball rollers, Cylindrical drive rollers, Clamps.... Still needs to be done for the AftCargo, but many single assets can be overtaken, while the basic layout is different back there.
  37. 33 points
    We will try to survive without your purchase jetkid. I'll make this forum section invisible for your account as it clearly serves no purpose for you.
  38. 32 points
    We always have a progress meeting with the whole dev team on Tuesday afternoon and from this moment on I will report on that to let you know what the status of the project(s) is. Of course not all but there is always something to tell. For example, Stefan now spend serious time using his latest insight and techniques on optimizing the modeling and textures. It may sound strange but even a master like Stefan still learns every day and it always tempting to reopen older projects to optimize them. What was used in the A330 VC is now also implemented in the A320 series and we can compare framerates between the new and the old. We gained at least 30%, at least. Keep in mind this is for the model only, not code so even though we believe the code is also optimized (but there is more). But we still believe the new models will be remarkably easier on frame rates. In all sims, not only P3d V4. At the end of this week we should have basically all the new code running. That means that both the A320 and A330 will be flying in 32 and 64 bits using all our new modules. It's a big step because it means we can start to show it to our internal test team ((almost all pilots and engineers). Then the looooong process of perfecting, tweaking, fixing etc starts. As the MCDU has gotten such a major rewrite we decided to start on extensive MCDU manual, a bit task but we feel it will be time well spend. As explained earlier, Connected Flight Deck is completely rewritten because we wanted to make it a lot easier to use. No more firewall issues etc. if you can receive real time weather in your sim, this will work. It will also allow an observer seat, so you can jump in the cockpit of other people flying, in fact we can handle many observers. A cool feature as you will see the cockpit exactly as the crew sees it. You can look around, zoom in and out. No need for Twitch or YT that only feed you a video stream, you will be IN the cockpit. This technology is fully written with API so it can be licensed to other dev teams. For sure out Twin Otter and the CRJ are scheduled to be using it later. We still believe flying on your own is very unrealistic, it is a main element of all our plans.
  39. 32 points
    Small friday update: Galley2 is now also done. The crew seats near the exit are detailed after this post (so please not complain about it). The layout resembles lufthansa.
  40. 31 points
    Small friday update: Basic shading is now done. Focus was oriented to complete the main panels. The other details are added later, so please not comply about missing visual features yet. Next week we re-introduce system funtionality to all VC elements and add higher resoluted displays. The pictures below show the textures as they appear in the sim (beside the missing details). Dirt is added as last and extra layer! The seat fabric is also being changed and shows currently the old state.
  41. 31 points
    Like a famous screenshot artist in another company forum tends to say; "My final shots"
  42. 31 points
    Dome Light's looking somewhat acceptable too.
  43. 31 points
    Time for a small update: Was again a shorter week here in germany due a celebration day, but the Bulkcargo Compartment is now also done. Next days will be used on a new platform, but back pretty soon....
  44. 30 points
    General disclaimer, I am going to be talking about how we do a "descend via" arrival in the United States. This is an arrival with a sequence of waypoints often with airspeed and altitude restrictions. The complicated part of this is that they are not all just "Cross FIX at ALT", rather they are "Cross FIX between ALT1 and ALT2, at 290kts". So how do we do that in the CRJ? Well, it is a bit more complicated than a Boeing or Airbus product. The CRJ series technically doesn't have VNAV (I am lying, but I will qualify that in a second though). We have advisory VNAV which is a very basic descent profile that the FMS generates based on entered crossing restrictions. I want to explain a bit of how it does this. To illustrate, lets go look at an arrival. http://155.178.201.160/d-tpp/1708/00253VANZE.PDF This is the VANZE1 RNAV arrival into Memphis, TN. Imagine you are the FMS. You have a desired descent angle which is 3.0 degrees. This is of course editable in the VNAV page 3/3 of the FMS. 3.0 works fairly well though and unless there is a massive tailwind will allow you to descend at near idle thrust maintaining profiled speeds. The way that the FMS builds the descent path goes as follows. Start at the end of the arrival with the first hard altitude (which is to say a restriction that isn't "at or above/below/between). On the VANZE arrival, that is HEXIN. Now, the FMS will draw backwards up the arrival a path of 3.0 degrees. At each waypoint it logic checks to see if you meet whatever restriction is entered in the LEGS page (it is important to note, before you fly any arrival like this you must manually verify each altitude at each fix is correct by cross referencing the chart). Now, if it fails this logic check and the 3.0 degree angle doesn't meet the proceeding restriction, then it will adjust the angle such that it does. So the result is you may see any angle of 2.8 or 3.2 on the LEGS page between waypoints to signify you will need an adjusted descent rate for that section of the arrival. The physical manifestation of all this is the white snowflake which appears on the PFD where the glideslope appears for the ILS. Following the snowflake will keep you within all restrictions of the arrival. If you are still with me, good job. That isn't the hardest part though. We need to now mention a few things about our friend, the snowflake. 1. It doesn't build deceleration stages like the 737 or A320. All it is concerned about it altitudes. So if the arrival requires you to decelerate to, say, 210KTS, then you must plan that into your descent on your own. 2. It doesn't account for your TAS changing as you descend. Hence, while one VS may have been working at a higher altitude, you will need a lower one as the descent progresses. Remember, we are attaching a VS to an angle. We are still doing a 3.0 degree descent, but much like the VS of a CRJ on a 3.0 ILS will be greater than that of a C172 doing the same approach because of the speed difference, the higher true airspeed for a given indicated airspeed at altitude will require a greater VS. *aerodynamics side note (skip if you want): a swept wing high altitude jet like the CRJ makes a lot of drag at higher altitudes going fast (drag = speed^2), so the higher vertical speed required for a 3.0 degree descent out of FL340 actually compliments this aerodynamic principal quite well. In my experience, the CRJ can easily do 3000FPM out of the high flight levels without accelerating, but below 20,000 often times it is hard to descend at more than 2,000FPM. 3. You cannot couple the autopilot to our friend the snowflake. The snowflake is a function of an angle. No where can we select a 3.0 flight path angle on FCP. 10/10 engineering. Even worse, the CRJ doesn't share with you what VS its currently using to compute the snowflakes rate of descent. I have to imagine this number totally exists somewhere within the Rockwell Collins avionics, but they decided to not tell us. So this can lead to you just chasing it with the VS wheel in hopes you are ballparking it correctly. There is however, a better way. *side note number 2: there are a few CRJs flying that actually have a VNAV button on the FCP. Guess what it does. It couples the snowflake to the autopilot. They're lucky. None of my companies airplanes have this button though, and I don't think that the AS CRJ7/9 has it either. So as near as I can tell, it doesn't exist. If you've been reading this up till now, I need to issue an apology. Everything we just talked about it kind of irrelevant because we don't actually use the snowflake in day to day operations. At least, most of us don't. I would consider it secondary descent profile information. Enough theory then, how do we actually do this? Good old airmenship and the DIR INTC page. The DIR INTC page is extremely useful for a singular reason. It will tell you the VS required to cross FIX at ALT, based on what you put on the LEGS page. A simple example to start, shall we. http://155.178.201.160/d-tpp/1708/00264SKETR.PDF Let's say ATC instructs us to cross SHONN at 11,000ft. We will enter that restriction into the LEGS page (because this is an EXPECT altitude, it will not have loaded when we load the arrival). Now, execute the change and switch over to the DIR INTC page. You will see the SHONN, an arrow pointing down, and a vertical speed. 11,000 should be in small font right above the VS. That is the VS required to cross SHONN at 11,000 based on your current altitude. There will also be your current angle from present position directly to SHONN. To cross SHONN at 11,000, dial in 11,000 into the FCP, wait for the angle to read 3.0 (or less, I like to descend a 2.5 sometimes just to make the ride a bit smoother and give me more options with a bit of power in on the descent), and start descending at the VS shown on the SHONN line of the DIR INTC page. I should note, if you do what I do and start down at an angle <3.0, you will never see the snowflake because you have never intercepted the 3.0 degree path created by the FMS which the snowflake obviously represents. Same situation, same arrival, same crossing restriction at SHONN, but now ATC asks you to cross SHONN at 250kts. Now you must slow down and go down. This is not one of the strong suits of the CRJ. In level flight, the thing will decelerate quite rapidly. It won't while descending though and in all honesty, the flight spoilers aren't too stellar slowing the bird down. Remember how I said that the snowflake doesn't build in deceleration legs, thats on you, the pilot! The only difference in our descent planning we will need to make is that we are going to need a level segment in order to decelerate. As we approach a 3.0 degree descent towards SHONN using the DIR INTC page, start down a bit early. Maybe at 2.8, however, add approximately 100 or 200FPM to the required rate of descent. This will ensure that we get to 11,000 a bit before SHONN and have enough time to decelerate to 250kts. The reason I wanted us to go through that example is so that we can now go to a more complicated one. Lets go back to the VANZE arrival into MEM that I linked to earlier, back at the top of this increasingly long essay. Pretend we are cleared for this arrival and we are starting it at the TALLO transition, landing South (18L/C/R). The restrictions are all in the LEGS page and ATC clears us to descend via the arrival. Great. The first crossing restriction is FASON at or above FL240. That is pretty easy. The next one is CRAMM at or below FL230, and VANZE has the same restriction. So what should we do? The honest answer is make it up as you go. You need a mental picture of what the entire arrival looks like in terms of vertical profile, but in reality you can't keep track of every set of restrictions in your head. There are way too many! So just worry about the next four, or so. FASON FL240A dist 37 CRAMM FL230B dist 10 VANZE FL230B dist 9 MASHH 16000/14000 Hypothetically, we cross both CRAMM and VANZE at FL230, are we going to be able to go from VANZE to MASHH and descend to 16,000ft to make the top of the gate? Probably not. Here it what I would do. Go look at your DIR INTC page. Look at the VS required for each waypoint. I am not sure exactly which altitude it will show for MASHH on the DIR INTC page, but it'll either be 16 or 14,000. It will sometimes change based on the arrival and profile and that is wayyy beyond what we are talking about here today. We have done enough pseudo coding of the airplane's avionics today. We need to now pick a vertical speed that will hit all the restrictions. Ideally you want something less than the VS to cross FASON, and greater than the VS to cross CRAMM. This will ensure you can cross FASON above 240, and CRAMM below 230. More than likely, that VS required to cross MASHH at 16,000. So that is probably the one you want to use. Wait until you are 3.0 degrees from MASHH and start down at that VS, assuming that VS is less than the VS for FASON and greater than that for CRAMM. If it doesn't meet those requirements, then you'll need to adjust it until it does. Lets say we cross FASON above 240 successfully. We can now start thinking about the waypoint after MASHH. CRAMM FL230B dist 10 VANZE FL230B dist 9 MASHH 16000/14000 dist 22 (skip w/ turn at HLI, no crossing restriction there) LARUE 12000/10000 Run the same algorithm in your head. You need to select a VS that will comply with all of the above. Rinse, repeat, until you hit the bottom of the arrival. And make sure you are complying with speed restrictions too. If that example was a little hard to follow I understand. The summary to all this: if you are flying an arrival with multiple crossing restrictions to hit, use the DIR INTC and your brain to select a descent rate that will comply with as much restrictions as you can. Look forward and ensure to not box yourself in a corner where you have to do an impossible rate of descent to make a restriction. Constantly be monitoring and adjusting. The snowflake is a good piece of supplementary information and if you're doing the above procedure correctly, you'll end up following it all the way down usually. It is important to understand the limitation of the system, such as no accounting for speed restrictions. For this, there is no substitute for human interaction and mental processing during these procedures. There is no simple way either, rather just practicing and engaging your brain. This is a huge pain. The CRJ avionics suite was built in the early 90s, well before any of these complicated RNAV procedures. We are using 25 year old tools to solve a modern day problem. This is genuinely the hardest thing to do in the CRJ and will make you feel like you've done some mental gymnastics. And once you get good at it, its very satisfying. Jumping back into the NGX or Airbus after this will make life seem pathetically easy. If any of that needs clarification, I will be happy to help.
  45. 30 points
    Short update. As you noticed we expanded the beta testing program recently. Calling it beta is a bit confusing as there are parts that are not completed but we need to have the sections that are done checked out right now. We only wanted professionals because we still need a lot of input and advise (the manuals do not tell the complete story rather often and as stated so often we do not simulate the aircraft but the job of the crew). What you might like to know is how our test team is build up. We got: Seven pilots Four engineers (mostly performance and propulsion specialists One rampy One flight attendant Two representatives of VATSIM and IVAO Several friends who are always willing to listen to our moaning We use a rather advanced project management systems (Zendesk Zoho) to share information, manage progress and to handle bug reports. Here you see how the testers can insert bugs: These bugs end up in the bug database and the responsible developer is notified. When he inserts a fix to our file versioning system it is automatically shared with the testers and the bug status is update to 'to be tested' status. My task as project manager is to make sure we have the right resources for each section and to make sure all parts are more or less finished at the same time.
  46. 30 points
    Connected Flight Deck The Connected Flight Deck (CFD from now on) allows two persons to fly an airliner together. Aerosoft feels this is very important because that is how airliners are flown. Flying one on your own is not only seriously unrealistic, it is even totally illegal in a real aircraft. Using CFD, the crew will be able to interact just as a real crew would and both parties will have access to all features of the product. CFD is fully optional. We believe it adds a lot of value but if you feel it is none of other people’s business where you fly, simply do not use it. We hope that people will quickly see the fun and practicality of using the system, even if they do not intend to fly with another person. Having somebody join you in the cockpit is just a great way of making your sim a more modern and interactive place. And what better way to help a new pilot getting to grips with the systems or with a difficult approach? Features (not completed list) It will be 100% free of charge and not used for any advertisement Totally transparent connection. No need to any setting of parameters in firewall or router Store your ongoing flight and pick it up from your own or another system later (yes, we did think of ‘Flight in the Cloud’ here) An optional voice channel, using highly modern compression, can be used for voice communication The weather, time etc will be send from the Captain system to all connected systems (navigation databases will NOT be shared) Observer Next to the Captain and First Officer there is a third role that can be chosen, that of Observer. In this role, your point of view is from the jump seat and you cannot interact with any of the aircraft systems, but if the Captain allows it will allow you to use the voice channel. Up to 50 observers can join a session.The observer role can be used to train people or to join friends in their flight. We also see it used as a way to simply observe other crews flying. Just start your sim, load the Airbus and see what sessions are active. When the Captain allows (aka made the session public) you can just be ‘beamed’ to the jump seat and join the flight. See the Observer option to ‘stream’ your flight. But instead of a limited video, the watchers are in the simulator with you. Of course, they will need the product itself to join. How it is used Start a session (by the Captain): Use the drop down menu option, type in a description, select [PUBLIC] or [CLOSED] and click [HOST]. That’s all. Join a session as First Officer: Use the drop down menu to select a session and select [JOIN AS FIRST OFFICER]. The Captain will need to confirm. That’s all, no IP addresses to enter to rules to enter in your router. Join a session as observer: Use the drop down menu, select [JOIN AS OBSERVER]. This is only possible for public sessions. Network, FPS and VAS Not an issue. The code is not even close to a megabyte, all processes run by cores not actively used by FS and the amount of data so small it will not even make a blip on your internet connection. Using the build in voice option will increase the needed bandwidth of course. In our tests the delay of using a server instead of a (less secure) direct connection is not an issue. IVAO and VATSIM 100% compatible, can be run at the same time. If IVAO or VATSIM would like to use any of the data from a public session they are free to do so. In the past, we have seen that both organizations strongly promote two person cockpits. CFD is not intended in any way as a new ‘network’ it is just a way to fly realistically in our Airbus and CRJ projects. Security and privacy The CFD server does not require any identification. There is no need to login as we do not store any user data (identifying a user). The only data that is send to and from the server (and can be stored on the server) are the CFD data packets. Even so, and because it is so easy, the data will be encrypted end to end. Forgetting all technical details, the CFD server works just like the weather server used in FS. You ask for weather and the server send the weather. There is no way the server can access memory outside FS, just as the weather server can’t. If the Caption has set the ‘Temporary Store’ option, the session will be stored for 14 days before being deleted. The server will most definitely not be used as a means to find pirates and will work equally well for paying customers and pirating rat bastards. To prevent this service being halted by Aerosoft’s unlikely demise (we are doing fine btw, growing all the time), the complete server code will be provided to a third independent party why will release it if we close the server. Licensing This technology can be licensed, just contact us. In fact it has been licensed already.
  47. 29 points
    Time for the friday update: During that week the overhead panel and small fuse panel was overhauled fully. New labels with the original font and higher resoluted textures were introduced. Below are two pictures with the pure raw textures, which need of course to be shaded for final use.
  48. 29 points
    Please do not see this as a sign of an imminent release but I was selecting images for the product page. It would be silly not to post some of them here. Fact is that the team will, again, be working the whole weekend to get this product released.
  49. 29 points
    Small friday update: I know it was rather calm the last weeks when you awaited to see more updates on the A330 project. The reasons for this are rooted in the update tasks for the A318-A321 project. You know already from Mathijs that all is set now onto a modernized modular version of the software base, but also in the 3d department there are happening deep changes: The VC model was strongly overworked to give it a higher performance of around 30% compared to the older one. As Prepar3D V4 demands a special shadow model to cast the aircraft shadow silhuette to the ground, we had to introduce now also the wing and engine into the VC view. Ontop the average cockpit texture resolution was raised and adapted to the demand that the new HDR viewing modes bring with them. Would the textures stay at the same color and brightness levels, they would be much too bright and saturated looking up and down on the panels. I will try to get some images starting from next friday, showing you the new visual features in action. The overall schedule will not delay the A330 that much and what is done from the software side can also used (adaptivly) in large parts on the A330 later itself. So dont think of that current "sideslip" as a pure delay for the A330.
  50. 29 points
    Really friday again? The time did flow by fast the last two weeks. Sadly i had not much time at all at the A330 as we tested all the new Prepar3D V4 features and to what way we can use them. For the A330 this is a huge favour too, as you can switch now the floodlights, domelights and the other lighting stuff fully independent from the panel backlighting, which so much of you dreamed of. This will be of course, part of the Prepar3D V4 package. We also talked with the sim makers of chances to get an efficient workout for dimmable stuff which is currently not implemented, and they reacted very open and i press thumbs we get that too in one of the later updates. So together with going 64bit and getting rid of that terrible small memory range of the past and all the other nice new features, the sim future looks technologically promising in that sector.